News in Interviews


Meet One Canoe Two

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Their beautiful letterpress cards and stationery had us sold, but then we took a closer look at One Canoe Two and found childhood friends, a family farm, a giant 100-year-old barn for an office...and their amazing 'everyone loves pie' recipes. Meet the lovely ladies behind our favourite new stateside stationery find.

We (Beth and Carrie) always talked about running some sort of business where we could sell our creations. We fell into letterpress after Beth's husband bought her a little Kelsey tabletop press before they got married. Our company’s name, 1canoe2, comes from years of the two dreaming up big ideas around a campfire and floating down a spring-fed Missouri river in a canoe. One canoe, two girls. One canoe, two. We began our business venture in late 2009, and soon after we invited Karen, Carrie’s sister-in-law to become a partner in the business. We now have two full-time employees and several part-time employees and interns.



We’re based in Columbia, Missouri, on Carrie’s family farm, in a barn studio that is over 100 years old. Carrie’s dad renovated the first floor of the barn to house the printing presses, paper cutter, and a small workspace. In May, a second renovation on the barn’s loft and east side provided space for offices, a production and shipping area, and a warehouse. We’ve done our best to preserve the beauty of the barn, including the exposed beams and solid wood floors, while adding modern conveniences such as more windows for natural lighting, heating and cooling, and a small kitchen area and restroom. Renovating the barn seemed natural because so much of our artwork draws upon our growing up experiences on farms in the Midwest. We can’t think of a better place to have our studio.



We both like the change of seasons throughout the year, but fall is probably our favorite. Fall in Missouri means the return of cool crisp air, apple picking, beautiful color changes in the trees, long Saturday hikes, and sitting around a bonfire roasting smores. The color in Missouri is pretty amazing – deep reds, bright oranges, and irresistible golds. Thanksgiving is the perfect culmination to the season – a day to be with family, give thanks for our bounty of blessings, and if it’s a nice day, time to be outside before winter arrives.



Carrie loves to learn how to perfect a skill, doing something over and over until she gets really good at it. She approaches her drawings with that in mind every day, but she thought it would be fun to do something she could more easily share with others. Lucky for all of us, she decided she wanted to be really good at making pies. The timing coincided perfectly with the start of the new year and she committed to baking a pie a week for the 2013 year, and that’s how Everyone Loves Pie came about. She’s made 35 of the 52 pies thus far (without repeats) and her pies are both beautiful and delicious. One of her favorite seasonal pies is sour cream apple pie. It's a highly requested pie for Thanksgiving. The recipe is as follows:

Sour Cream Apple Pie

Topping:
 3 tablespoons butter, softened
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons flour

Filling:
1 1/3 cup sour cream
 2/3 cup sugar
 1/4 teaspoon salt
 2 teaspoons vanilla
 2 large eggs
 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
 4 or 5 large Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and thinly sliced

Prepare a single pie crust from your favorite pie crust recipe and fit into a deep-dish 9 or 10 inch pie plate.

To make the topping, in a bowl blend the butter, sugar, cinnamon, and flour until the mixture is combined well. Cover and chill the topping.

To make the filling, whisk together the sour cream, sugar, salt, vanilla, eggs, and flour until the mixture is smooth. Add the peeled, cored, and thinly sliced apples and stir the filling and apples together.

Spoon the filling into the chilled pie crust and crumble the topping evenly over it. Bake the pie on a baking sheet in the middle of a pre-heated 350 degree oven, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. (You may need to put a bit of tin foil on top of the pie during the last 15 minutes or so of baking. Keep an eye on it, you don’t want the top to burn!)

Transfer the pie to a rack and let it cool completely. Dig in and enjoy!


Q&A with Hudson's 'Uncle Les'

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The Hudson team rocked up to install their pop-up shoe shop in our project space last Friday. Among them was Les - the brand's resident shoe expert (they have an 'Ask Uncle Les' on their website). There is no shoe-related question this man can't answer, so we took the opportunity to grill him about what we should be wearing on our feet this season (and a few less serious matter too).   

Tell us a bit about the collection you've put together for The Hambledon pop-up? 

I think the collection is reflective of the store; it's a range that is simple and effortless in style. I think there's a pair of shoes in there to suit everyone's taste and you'd be hard pushed not to find an essential pair to compliment the key pieces in your wardrobe for the A/W season! 

What are the girls wearing on their feet this season?

This season the girls will be sporting androgynous and punk inspired boots, block wooden heels and an array of textures. The 90s are back!

And how are they wearing them?

The boots look great lending a masculine edge to a feminine dress. Or styled up with oversized coats and a pop of colour. The shoes, made up of patent loafers and hi-shine flats, lend themselves to the continuing ‘prep’ trend.

Favourite new style of the season for the girls?

Impossible to choose! But the Mirar Ankle Boot and Paddi Brogue would be up there.

Favourite new style of the season for boys?

Toecap Fenway in Tan. No question. Would look fantastic with a pair of Norse Projects chinos.

What will be on the Hudson playlist at The Hambledon?

Daddy You're a Fool to Cry by The Rolling Stones.

Where are you hanging out in the Hudson manor?
(Hudson are based in East London)

I like to get home to Leigh on Sea. I love it there.

What's your favourite thing at the moment?

Dixie Lee and Coops. (Les has a brand new baby daughter to go with his lovely son Cooper)

Hudson Pop Up 1

Q&A with Mikkel Krath of Norse Projects

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Norse Projects has to be one of the most influential menswear brands of recent years. They've certainly won a loyal following here in the basement thanks to their distinctive take on Nordic workwear meets contemporary streetwear. Here as their AW13 collection hits the shop floor, we talk Copenhagen and cool beers with sales manager Mikkel Krath.

Describe your typical working day?

I walk to work and answer too many emails. The showroom and studio is located in a cool central part of Copenhagen with a lot of cafés, bars and stores so when we go outside for a coffee and smoke we can meet friends and watch the world go past. I’ll often have meetings with the design and production teams and that’s the regular 9-5. Half the time though, I’m on the road doing fairs around the world or visiting customers.

When and where are you most productive?

Has to be in the morning when I first show up at the office. I have a 1.5 year old son so I have to be productive when I’m at the studio. No more working late nights!

Who or what couldn't you live without?

I guess it’s obvious choice but it has to be my iPhone. Not sure how I managed anything before the iPhone era!

What do you like most about what you do?

I love providing products to people who share the same values when it comes to design and quality. It’s just a great feeling providing people with quality stuff. And of course working in a creative environment with creative people is amazing.

Who or what inspires you?

I would say the entire Norse Projects team has inspired me a lot. The people involved come from so many different backgrounds and we all see things from different perspectives.

Tell us something we're unlikely to know about
Norse Projects.

Norse started as a retail concept which pooled inspiration, product, imagery and stories from a number of backgrounds. The retail element is still a strong part of our business but Norse Projects stands on its own feet as a brand now.

What project, collection or achievement are you most proud of?

I would say the constant development of the brand and company. We have come a long way but the journey continues.

What has been the most important lesson learnt?

You've got to work hard to make success. Nothing comes easy. Turn off your email sometimes.

What would you like to do in the future?

Don’t need to worry about that because they will have invented time machines by then. 

What is the Norse Project team's guilty pleasure?

We’re all so different but can mostly agree on a few too many cold beers.

And finally, Mikkel Krath's top three Copenhagen must see/dos.

Bo-bi Bar. One of the oldest bars in Copenhagen.
Louisiana Modern Art Museum
Canal tour. Copenhagen is best seen from the water.



Q&A with Anna Singh, Co-founder of Chinti & Parker

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We've been big fans of Chinti & Parker since the beginning and have loved watching how the brand has evolved since launching back in 2009. Here, as we take delivery of their AW13 collection, we talk to co-founder Anna Singh, pictured left.

Describe your typical working day?

I’m not sure there is a typical day as both my partner [cousin Rachael Wood] and I are extremely hands on; we direct all aspects of business, so a single day might include planning the next collection, conducting sales appointments and press interviews, managing any number of ecommerce projects, and a fair bit of number-crunching and business strategy. The common thread is a fairly early wake-up call via my two sons, and a healthy amount of ribbing from Rachael who is a bit of a comedienne.

Who or what couldn't you live without?

My family, Wagamama’s chicken Katsu curry and a sense of humour.

What do you like most about what you do?

I’m building something extremely personal, and when people respond positively to it, it’s hugely rewarding.

Tell us a bit about how Chinti & Parker has evolved since launching in 2009?

I like to think we started out small, but perfectly formed. We launched with a capsule collection of high quality, well-designed basics in organic cotton and cashmere. Since then, we’ve expanded considerably, and now offer a well-versed collection of luxury casualwear with a strong focus on knitwear that combines classic cuts with fashion-minded details. I like to think we create the sort of pieces you’ll return to year in year out, but always feel stylish in.

What has been your proudest moment to date?

There have been a lot of highlights in the last year or so, including amazing press coverage and high profile collaborations with Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop and cult pattern studio Patternity. However, I’m most proud of the fact that we’ve grown our business considerably in the last year and have subsequently been able to double our team and output. For a young business, this is no mean feat.

What has been the most important lesson learnt?

The bigger your company and profile gets, the easier it is to become distracted from the essence of your brand. Having constant checkpoints in place to keep you focused is crucial.

Who or what inspires you?

We take inspiration from everywhere: a childhood jumper, a tile pattern we’ve seen on our travels, the colour of sun-bleached paper, and any number of style icons past and present. It’s a constantly evolving, eclectic thing, and subconsciously I’m always looking for triggers.

What is team Chinti & Parker's guilty pleasure?

Oh gosh, too many to list! Definitely something edible… probably a mid-afternoon sugar fix in the form of Krispy Kremes. And we’ve been known to check out the Mail online.

And finally, tell us a bit about a few of our favourite pieces from this season's collection... 

This season is a balance of graphic intarsia knits, charming handmade prints and versatile separates that do office, evening and off-duty. We loving the Aztec sweater as it lends instant nowness to jeans and a jacket, while the voile shirt is a pretty dress-up, dress-down piece that’s chic without being overdone. For print, the box tee in our handmade ‘tooth’ print is a great way to do pattern in an understated way.


Q&A WITH TONY PATELLA, DESIGNER AND FOUNDER OF TELLASON DENIM

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DESCRIBE YOUR TYPICAL WORKING DAY?
I start by responding to emails from around the world from our distributors, retailers and/or consumers. Then Pete and I will assess the situation regarding orders to ship during the day -- orders from distributors, retailers and/or webshop orders. Then it is off to the factory to check on production and take care of hems for customers.

WHEN AND WHERE ARE YOU MOST PRODUCTIVE?
At my home office in the morning before heading to our studio.

WHO OR WHAT COULDN'T YOU WORK WITHOUT?
I find myself depending on my iPhone and Dropbox quite often.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT WHAT YOU DO?
Interacting with consumers. Talking with them about durable products and the value in buying things that last versus cheap, disposable items. The all-important "cost-per-wear" idea.

WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU?
Pete and I tend to look back on our childhoods in California during the 1970s and the punk rock ethos prevalent back then. We didn't know it as teenagers, but the honest, do-it-yourself and be-yourself spirit of the punk movement had a lasting impact on us. We realize that it is important to have a specific point of view and to not try to be all things to all people.

TELL US SOMETHING WE'RE UNLIKEY TO KNOW ABOUT TELLASON DENIM?
One aspect of Tellason that we're most proud of and feel that we do not talk about enough is the fact that all three of our Cone Mills White Oak selvage denims (12.5, 14.75 and 16.5 oz) are exclusive to us and that we developed these fabrics with Cone to fit specific wear and aging profiles. We believe that it is important for the consumer and retailer to know that our Ladbroke Grove fit in 14.75 oz denim will be the same a year from today as it is today.

WHAT PROJECT, COLLECTION OR ACHIEVEMENT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?
We're really proud of the aforementioned Cone White Oak selvage fabrics we developed and are also very pleased with our distribution in Japan. If you would've told us two years ago that we would be sold in 100+ stores in what is arguably the world's most sophisticated denim market, I wouldn't have believed it.

WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSON LEARNED?
Be nice to people. If they're a consumer, understand that they have 100s of choices when it comes to buying pants and that they deserve your respect and time if they're considering yours. If they're a supplier and they deliver the product or service you asked for, pay them. If they're a retailer, realize it is a partnership and it is in both parties best interest that Tellason sells well in their shop.

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO IN THE FUTURE?
Buy a house on the island of Anguilla (BWI) and live there a couple of months per year. The rest of the time, let friends use it for free.

WHAT IS THE TELLASON TEAM'S GUILTY PLEASURE?
Sounds silly, but we love the tacos de carnitas dorados at La Taqueria in San Francisco and take great pleasure in taking any carnivorous visitors to eat what we believe is the finest use of swine on the planet.

AND FINALLY, TONY PATELLA'S TOP 3 SAN FRANCISCO MUST SEE/DOS?
I can't name only three. Here is a rambling, incoherent list:
Tacos de carnitas dorados at La Taqueria
Espresso at Four Barrel Coffee
Beers at Toronado
A visit to the the Ferry Building farmer's market
Dinner at Delfina
A journey across the Golden Gate Bridge to the Marin Headlands
Dinner at Sushi Ran in Sausalito
A Giants game at AT&T Park
Oysters in West Marin
Pints at the Pelican Inn in Marin
California Academy of Science
Menswear shopping at Unionmade

Tellason Interview news

Q&A with Adam Brown, designer and founder of Orlebar Brown

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DESCRIBE YOUR TYPICAL WORKING DAY?
I prefer to start early and am awake for 6.30am, walking the dogs by 7am and in the office for 8.15. Days are usually taken up with meetings both with staff and externally. I like to leave the office at 5pm and squeeze in the gym before getting home at 7pm to deal with evening emails.

WHEN AND WHERE ARE YOU MOST PRODUCTIVE?
Early mornings are when I feel most productive and walking the dogs is a great time for thinking and planning.

WHO OR WHAT COULDN'T YOU WORK WITHOUT?
The OB staff and my iphone.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT WHAT YOU DO?
The whole process of seeing something through from an idea that transforms into an actual product in a shop is immensely satisfying.

WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU?
The world at large, my friends, my experiences, art and music… everything drips through in one way or another.

TELL US SOMETHING WE'RE UNLIKEY TO KNOW ABOUT ORLEBAR BROWN?
We are launching a women’s collection for May 2013- watch this space.

WHAT PROJECT, COLLECTION OR ACHIEVEMENT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?
Our Fifth Year Anniversary in May 2012 which was marked with a party, Hulton Getty special edition Photographic print shorts and a Photography competition which launched the,’OB way of life’.

WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSON LEARNED?
Cash flow is king!

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO IN THE FUTURE?
Write a hit song, tell a joke on a stage, run a marathon and be happy.

WHAT IS THE ORLABAR BROWN TEAM'S GUILTY PLEASURE?
Thirsty Thursdays.

WE KNOW YOU'RE A BIT OF A LOCAL BOY OFTEN SPOTTED IN OUT MENSWEAR DEPARTMENT. CAN YOU TELL US WHAT CONNECTS YOU TO THE AREA?
Having been brought up in Winchester, I went to Henry Beaufort, Peter Symonds Sixth Form and Winchester School of Art. My sister still lives here and I used to have a cottage outside Stockbridge in the Test Valley. Winchester is still where my heart is and I try to come back as often as I can. Now The Hambledon has such a great men’s offering there is even more reason to come back.

Orlebar Brown

Q&A with Jane Lewis, designer and founder of Goat

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Jane lewis launched Goat ten years ago, spotting a gap in the market for luxurious yet understated timeless pieces. The label soon became the go-to cashmere range for the fashion cognoscenti. Now, entering it's second decade, the brand has developed in to a full ready to wear collection including those signature knits but now also encompassing it's equally recognisable separates, dresses and outerwear. 

Describe your typical working day?
It’s varied. Production and sampling are simultaneous so there is always lots to do. I speak to each member of my team on my way in to the office and turn my attention to whatever takes priority. Fittings in the mornings, design meetings or fabric appointments.

When and where are you most productive?
The mornings. After my coffee and I have settled at my desk.

Who or what couldn't you work without?
Honestly? My absolutely brilliant team. They are inspired and dedicated. We work very closely and openly together.
And my favourite thick italic black pens which I draw with and a great big pile of white paper to hand ….

What do you like most about what you do?
It never gets old. There are so many creative opportunities and although making a collection is incredibly hard work it’s also really fun. I learn a lot each season. I love seeing my original sketches and then looking over at the finished product. It’s rewarding.

Who or what inspires you?
Anything and everything. A colour, a picture….

Tell us something we're unlikely to know about Goat?
I am not trained in fashion at all and I can’t sew a button.

What project, collection or achievement are you most proud of?
I am so proud of how the company has grown recently. I remember starting the business in my kitchen!
We are now a team of 12 and growing….

What has been the most important lesson learned?
To stay true to my own aesthetic. Trends come and go but style endures. As a company we have expanded a lot in terms of the range and it’s important to always remember my original handwriting.

What do you want to do in the future?
Have an accessories line.

What is the Goat team's guilty pleasure?
Breakfast. All important decisions seem to be discussed over coffees and poached eggs! 

Goat Interview